Our Specialists .

Image of Estefania McPhaul

Economic Growth and Trade Global Practice Lead Estefania McPhaul

Estefania McPhaul is an economic growth and trade specialist with more than ten years of progressive experience managing complex economic growth projects for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the World Bank, and the International Development Bank. Estefania currently serves as global practice lead of Chemonics’ Economic Growth and Trade (EGT) practice where she leverages her expertise to enhance Chemonics’ project performance, support the development of competitive proposals, and foster innovation, industry engagement and thought leadership in the areas of trade and regulatory reform, entrepreneurship and enterprise development, financial services, public financial management, and business enabling environment. Estefania has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Washington and Lee University and a master’s degree in international trade and investment policy from the George Washington University.

by Estefania McPhaul


How Chemonics Is Mobilizing Finance for Development

USAID is putting self-reliance at the core of its strategy to help countries achieve and finance their own development objectives and thereby end their need for foreign assistance. To finance self-reliance, countries will need systems that mobilize and spend public resources efficiently, enabling environments that allow the private sector to thrive, and diverse and well-regulated…

2020 Vision: Three Development Trends of the New Decade

Despite a global commitment, the U.N. estimates that countries and donors need $2.5 trillion in additional finance each year to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, official development assistance in 2018 was $153 billion. The number speaks for itself: the development community simply cannot…

Building Bridges Between Financial Institutions and Rural Communities in Post-Conflict Regions

This article originally appeared on the SEEP Network’s blog. In a large city, it probably would take you less than five minutes to find an ATM. In a small town, however, finding an ATM can be much more challenging. Imagine that you live in a small town torn by decades of armed conflict, and like…