Our Specialists .

Deputy Chief of Party- Technical, USAID/Colombia Migration Management Activity Juan Barco

Juan is an expert in social policy, with over 14 years of experience working on the implementation and evaluation of Colombian national policies to overcome extreme poverty. He currently serves as the Deputy Chief of Party – Technical for the $40 million USAID/Colombia Migration Management Activity, the first task order under the Venezuela Response Integration Activity. Juan has previously worked on three USAID programs: Afro-descendants and Indigenous Peoples, Alliances for Reconciliation, and Human Resources for Health in 2030 (HRH2030). In each of the projects he led the development of policies and programs for social protection, entrepreneurship, and productive development. In 2019, as director of HRH2030, he received the USAID CLA Case Competition award for his contribution to strengthening the social protection system in Colombia. Juan has degrees in International Relations and Political Science from the Universidad del Rosario and a master’s degree in Development Management and Practice from the Universidad de los Andes, and has completed the Minimaster in Management and Leadership from ASU. Juan is proficient in English and has basic proficiency in French.

by Juan Barco


How Do We Measure Collaboration?

This HRH2030 blog post by Katy Gorentz and Juan Barco discusses the challenges and benefits of incorporating hard-to-quantify questions in monitoring, evaluation, and learning approaches.

Three Questions with Juan Barco: Addressing the Needs of Children in Adversity in Colombia

In this HRH2030 Q&A with Juan Barco, he discusses his inspiration for working with children facing adversity, challenges facing the social service workforce in Colombia, and improvements to Colombia's child protection system.

Three Questions with Juan Barco: Addressing the Needs of Children in Adversity in Colombia (Spanish)

In this HRH2030 Q&A with Juan Barco, he discusses his inspiration for working with children facing adversity, challenges facing the social service workforce in Colombia, and improvements to Colombia's child protection system.